What Food Have Fiber?

A list of high-fiber foods including fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and seeds.

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1.What is fiber?

Dietary fiber, also known as roughage, is the indigestible part of plant foods that travels through our digestive system mostly intact. Fiber has many health benefits, including keeping us regular and helping to lower cholesterol levels.

There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and can help to regulate blood sugar levels and cholesterol. It is found in oats, barley, legumes, apples, pears, citrus fruits and flaxseed. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and helps with digestion by adding bulk to the stool and keeping things moving through the digestive tract. It is found in whole grains, wheat bran, nuts, seeds and vegetables such as leafy greens and root vegetables.

Most plant-based foods contain both types of fiber, but generally have more of one or the other. For example, oats are higher in soluble fiber while wheat bran is higher in insoluble fiber. It’s important to eat a variety of high-fiber foods to get the most benefit.

2.What are the benefits of fiber?

Fiber is important for overall health. It helps reduce the risk of constipation, hemorrhoids, and gastrointestinal disorders such as diverticulosis and Crohn’s disease. Fiber also helps control blood cholesterol levels by binding with bile acids and promoting their excretion. In addition, fiber may help to prevent colon cancer.

Fiber is found in plant foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. It is not found in animal foods such as meat, poultry, fish, or milk. The best way to get enough fiber is to eat a variety of fiber-rich foods every day.

The table below lists some good sources of dietary fiber.

Food Serving Size Total Fiber (grams)
Black beans 1/2 cup 7
Lentils 1/2 cup 7
Split peas 1/2 cup 8
Artichoke (globe or Jerusalem) 1 medium 10
Baked beans 1/2 cup 10
Broccoli 1/2 cup chopped 3 1 spear (large) 3 1 stalk 3 1 floweret 3
Brussels sprouts 1/2 cup cooked 3-4 whole Brussels sprouts 2 Cherries, sweet 10 Raw 1 Cup 9 Clams 3 ounces 13 Collards 1/2 cup cooked 5 Corn on the cob 1 ear 11 Crabs 3 ounces 10 Figs 2 fresh figs 4 Fish 3 ounces 25 Fruit cocktail canned in water or its own juice 1/2 cup 4 Grapes 12 whole 2 Guava 2 inches wide 4 Kidney beans 1/2 cup 11 Lima beans 1/2 cup 7 Lobster 3 ounces 10 Nectarine 1 medium 2 Orange 1 medium 3 Papaya slices canned in water or its own juice 12 oz 6 Grapefruit sections canned in water or own juice 12 oz 8 Peaches canned in water or its own juice 12 oz 5 Pears canned in water or its own juice 12 oz 6 Pineapple chunks canned in water or its own juice 12 oz 5 Prunes dried 5 Raisins small box (1.5 oz) 2 Raspberries 1 cup 8 Spinach cooked from fresh 10 Strawberries 1 cup 3 Tangerines 2 small 8 Tomato paste 6 oz 18 Vegetable soup canned condensed 12 fl oz 19 Watermelon raw wedge 20 Wax beans 1/2 cup 4

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3.How much fiber do you need?

The amount of fiber you need depends on your age and gender. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend the following daily fiber intakes:

men age 50 and younger: 38 grams

men age 51 and older: 30 grams

women age 50 and younger: 25 grams

women age 51 and older: 21 grams

pregnant women: 28 grams

breastfeeding women: 29 grams

4.Which foods have fiber?

There are two types of dietary fiber — soluble and insoluble. Both are beneficial, but they have different functions.

Soluble fiber (found in oats, beans, apples, and citrus fruits) dissolves in water to form a gel-like substance. It can help with bowel regularity and lowering blood cholesterol and glucose levels.

Insoluble fiber (wheat bran, whole grains, seeds, nuts, legumes, and vegetables such as carrots, celery, and tomatoes) doesn’t dissolve in water. It helps add bulk to stool and prevents constipation.

Getting enough fiber is important for maintaining good gut health. Most Americans don’t consume enough dietary fiber — the average intake is only 15 grams per day, when the recommended amount is 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men.

5.How to add more fiber to your diet

Fiber is an essential nutrient that most people need more of. The Institute of Medicine recommends that men consume 38 grams of fiber per day, and women consume 25 grams. However, the average American only consumes about 15 grams of fiber per day.

There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble. Both types are important for maintaining a healthy digestive system and preventing constipation.

There are many ways to increase your fiber intake. One easy way is to add more high-fiber foods to your diet. Here are some examples of high-fiber foods:

-Beans and legumes: black beans, kidney beans, lentils, chickpeas, split peas
-Whole grains: oats, barley, buckwheat, whole wheat bread and pasta
-Fruits and vegetables: raspberries, pears, apples, broccoli, carrots
-Nuts and seeds: flaxseed, chia seeds, almonds, pistachios

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6.The best sources of fiber

Here are the best sources of fiber, according to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans:

Beans and legumes: black beans, kidney beans, pinto beans, lentils, chickpeas, and split peas
Vegetables: broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, corn
Fruits: apples, berries, citrus fruits, bananas, pears
Whole grains: oats, barley, brown rice

7.The benefits of soluble and insoluble fiber

There are two types of dietary fiber — soluble and insoluble — and both are important for human health.

Soluble fiber dissolves in water to form a gel-like substance. It’s found in foods such as oats, barley, beans, apples, citrus fruits, carrots, and peas. Some types of soluble fiber may help lower blood cholesterol and glucose levels.

Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water. It’s found in foods such as wheat bran, whole wheat breads, corn bran, seeds, and nuts. This type of fiber promotes regularity by helping food move through your digestive system.

Most plant-based foods — fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes — contain some amount of both soluble and insoluble fiber.

8.How to get the most benefit from fiber

Fiber is an essential part of a healthy diet, but many people lack the recommended amount of fiber each day. This can put them at risk for heart disease, stroke, and other chronic health conditions.

The best way to get the most benefit from fiber is to eat a variety of high-fiber foods. These include fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and nuts. It’s also important to drink plenty of water when you’re increasing your fiber intake.

Fiber has a number of benefits for your health, including:

-Helping to regulate bowel movements
-Decreasing your risk of heart disease
-Lowering cholesterol levels
-Controlling blood sugar levels
-Aiding in weight loss

9.Possible side effects of fiber

Fiber is generally considered to be a healthy food component. However, there are some possible side effects associated with eating foods high in fiber. These side effects are typically associated with consuming large amounts of fiber or consuming fiber from certain sources.

The most common side effect of eating foods high in fiber is gas and bloating. This occurs because fiber is not digested by the body and instead travels through the digestive system unchanged. When fiber reaches the large intestine, bacteria in the gut ferment the fiber, which produces gas and can cause bloating.

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Another possible side effect of consuming large amounts of fiber is constipation. This can occur because fiber absorbs water as it travels through the digestive system, which can make stool harder and more difficult to pass.

In some cases, people may also experience diarrhea when they consume foods high in fiber. This is because fiber can help to bulk up stool and make it easier to pass through the intestines.

10.The bottom line on fiber

We need fiber for good health, but most of us don’t get enough. A high-fiber diet can help with constipation, obesity, heart disease, and more. The best way to increase your fiber intake is to eat more plant-based foods like vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and beans.

Here are 10 high-fiber foods that are super healthy.

1. Chia seeds: These tiny seeds are packed with fiber – 11 grams in just 2 tablespoons. They also have calcium, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids.
2. Lentils: Lentils are a great source of fiber – 16 grams in 1 cup cooked lentils. They’re also a good source of protein, iron, and potassium.
3. Black beans:Black beans are very high in fiber – 15 grams in 1 cup cooked black beans. They’re also a good source of protein, iron, and magnesium.
4. Broccoli: Broccoli is a great source of fiber – 5 grams in 1 cup cooked broccoli. It’s also a good source of vitamins C and K.
5. Brussels sprouts: Brussels sprouts are another good source of fiber – 4 grams in 1 cup cooked Brussels sprouts. They’re also a good source of vitamins C and K.
6. Avocado: Avocados are a good source of fiber – 7 grams in 1 medium avocado. They’re also a good source of healthy fats, vitamins C and E, and potassium.
7. Raspberries: Raspberries are an excellent source of fiber – 8 grams in 1 cup raspberries . They’re also a good source of vitamin C and manganese.
8. Psyllium husk:Psyllium husk is a type of soluble fiber that’s often used as a laxative or to improve digestive health . It contains 7 grams of fiber in just 2 tablespoons . Psyllium husk is also a good source of magnesium .
9 . Oats : Oats are an excellent source of fiber – 7 grams in 1/2 cup dry oats . Oats are also a good source of vitamins B1 , B2 , and E , as well as minerals like chromium , copper , iron , magnesium , manganese , phosphorus , selenium , and zinc .

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